real world learning

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CHERISH Worship

This year, CHERISH worships have taken on a new vision for our students. Over the summer, Kindergarten teacher, Ms. Kate Kamarad, was moved to pray over the weekly Lower School (LS) CHERISH worships that bring the youngest in our school together at the end of the end of each week. She then brought her plan to the other LS teachers who jumped right into the idea.

The plan is to inspired our students to lead the worships themselves. These student led – service oriented meets are just what our little ones need to feel encouraged and inspired.

The first few weeks will be led by Upper and Middle School. Already, we’ve had Michael Brodis, a senior at MHA, telling his story and showing the LS students how to stand up and speak. This week, first grade led out in singing and prayer and three of our Middle School students gave the worship. It’s wonderful to see our youth take the stage with their stories and leadership. The confidence students show when they get up front lets our students know they can do it, too.

Going forward, our own LS students will take front and center with service projects, small group discussions, skits, and stories. How exciting to see every part of our school take a leadership role and show that have something to say.

Thank you, teachers, for showing the ultimate leadership by putting our students in the lead. Because when students take ownership of their stories, their learning, their God-given talents, they shine brighter.

After today’s Middle School worship, Kindergarten student, Emma, whispered to Ms. Kate, “Maybe next time we can be up there talking about Jesus?!” Exactly, Emma, that’s exactly what we want you to do.

We are all so excited to see our little ones stand up and lead!

(pictures and quote from Ms. Kate Kamarad)

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College Ready?

Mile High Academy is a college prep school. This means that your child will graduate with the grades, test scores, and skills required to enter college. But what does being College Ready mean? We often think these two are the same thing.

Well, at MHA we want our students to be both college prepared and college ready. This means that they not only have the academic skills but the social/emotional skills to enter college and the next part of their life journey.

A recent article from the New York Times put it this way, in “adolescence, we expect more initiative and investment regarding duties and obligations, but most parents don’t abdicate oversight altogether. In other words, the parent and adolescent co-own the adolescent’s responsibilities.

The most reliable signal that the transition to emerging adulthood has begun is evidence that the child has begun taking sole ownership of these responsibilities — independent of parental involvement.” (1) You can read more about what the New York Times has to say on the subject.

However, here’s what we have to say on the subject. At MHA we create an environment where responsibility is clearly articulated. The distinction between what is the student’s and what is the parent’s responsibility should always be clear.

Preschool through 5th grade is a learning curve of parents involved in the day to day details, folders going home, daily conversations with teachers. But heading into middle school, students start taking on their own schedules. Something as seemingly insignificant as a locker becomes ownership of property and responsibility for the care of it.

And yes, once they are in Upper School, there is a lot more responsibility on our students’ shoulders, but isn’t that what we’ve been preparing them for all along. After all, if your child can take advanced placement classes, can’t they handle the other responsibilities that come with getting ready to enter the world. We know they can!

If you ever have questions about how we prepare our students for the future, contact one of our amazing teachers.

 

  1. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/26/well/how-to-help-a-teenager-be-college-ready.html
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The facts are in on Real World Learning (RWL)

Real World Learning asks teachers to “guide” students through the learning process. Traditional teaching is re-framed in the context of a project that reaches out into the real world.

Projects within RWL do not mean just presenting a poster or speaking on a subject they learned about in class. Instead, RWL asks students to answer a “Driving Question”, open ended content that they must explore and delve into in order to become experts. This is done in collaboration with a team, guided by the teacher, is a sustained inquiry process that takes them until they have created a product that is authentic to the real world or the student’s life.

Check out more on RWL at milehighacademy.org/realworldlearning.

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